Prints: Monoprint #24, 2017

kurt_seidle_monoprint_24_2017

This one was a couple of seasons in the making – but it’s finally ready for the world.

Five colors on found paper. Available at the Cherokee Heights Arts Festival in Marietta Georgia on Saturday, November 11. But there’s only one to be had, so be quick! See you there?

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Things We Like: “Wait in the Car”

Colors! Layers! Bricks!

The Breeders are back with a new 7″ single and a super-saturated new video by former Vaughn Oliver associate Chris Bigg. Oliver and Bigg are, of course, praised for their cover art and design expertise on so many 4AD projects including every single Pixies release. This video is right up there with the best of them.

You’re going to need to watch this one full-screen.

Knits: Graph Paper Mitts Pattern

 

These light fingerless gloves use worsted and fingering weight yarn together in a two-color slipped stitch pattern reminiscent of graph paper.

These fingerless mitts knit from the bottom cuff up.
They are knit in the round.

Special skills:
• Knitting in the round
• Increase & Decrease
• Slipped stitches

Size: Adult
Approximate finished measurements: Glove length: 7 in (17.75 cm), Flat width: 3 in (7.6 cm) – 1 in larger in thumb gusset area.

Needles: US 6 (4.0 mm) double pointed needles – set of 4 recommended.
Tapestry needle.

Yarn: Approx 65 yds (60 m) each of worsted and fingering weight yarn (This pattern can also be knit with Aran and Sport weight for a heavier fabric glove.)

 

You can buy the pattern here:
Available on Etsy for $3.50
Available on Craftsy for $3.50

Knit Pattern: Rhombic Mitts

It’s fingerless glove knitting season again! The Cherokee Heights Arts Festival is coming up in November and I’m working on creating a new collection of the most popular item: fingerless gloves. Glove production is also my pattern design workshop where I work up new patterns, test them out a few times, write them down, and then test knit them with the yarn I think works best and photographs well. First up this season is Rhombic Mitts. I enjoyed the Ironwork Mitts from last year so much, I decided to do a new variation on the theme.

You can buy the pattern here:
Available on Etsy for $3.50
Available on Craftsy for $3.50

The Details:
These fingerless mitts knit from the bottom cuff up.
They are knit in the round.

Special skills:
• Knitting in the round
• Increase & Decrease
• Twisted stitches
• Cable stitches

Size: Adult
Approximate finished measurements: Glove length: 6.5 in (16.5 cm), Flat width: 3 in (7.6 cm) – larger in thumb gusset area.

Needles: US 6 (4.0 mm) double pointed needles – set of 4 recommended. Cable needle.
Stitch marker and stitch counter optional.

Yarn: Worsted Weight, approx 95 yds (87 m)

Knits: Summer Shawls

 

My exploration of shawls this summer was inspired by favorite local yarn shop, Eat.Sleep.Knit, and their Flash KAL (Knit A-Long) for the simple yet stunning pattern Clapotis. This pattern was perfect for showing off the beauty and texture of hand-dyed yarn and I loved how it turned out using Blue Moon Fiber Arts Marine Silk Worsted (now discontinued) in the color, The Final Frontier.

I enjoyed it so much, I decided to pull out some beautiful Debbie Bliss Fine Donegal I had stashed about two years ago to knit up another one. This fingering weight yarn created an even lighter shawl perfect for fall in southern climes.

Encouraged by my success, I looked for another project and found Shockwaves by Beata Jezek. I was immediately drawn to the quirky asymmetrical chevrons and bold color choices of many of the projects on Ravelry. In the end, I decided to contrast the pattern with a soft ombre of beautiful blue-greys of Madelinetosh Eyre Light. The depth of tone and soft single ply of the yarn kept this very large shawl from becoming overly heavy.

My last shawl project of the summer looks forward to autumn with the sunset colors of Claudia Handpainted Yarns Addiction (aptly named) in Be My Valentine and Makes Me Hungry applied to Melanie Berg’s Assante. The simple striping of this pattern allowed the brighter mix of colors to emerge from dusky darkness for a light and fluttery shawl that can be worn like a scarf. While I love the result, the shawl is knit length-wise, so as the rows build, the row length becomes considerable, especially to a knitter used to row counts of under 200 stitches. That aside, I highly recommend this pattern and may knit another one in the future.