Knit Gift: Hitofude Cardigan

Its been a while since I’ve posted any knits because I’ve been working on a larger piece as a gift for my mom: the Hitofude Cardigan. She was looking for a unique lace cardigan that she could wear in the fall and spring, so we hit Ravelry and started looking through the boundless pattern library. After narrowing it down to a few options, we decided on the pattern by Hiroki Fukatsu for its timeless elegance and simple lines. The beautiful pictures made it an easy choice and the recommendation of Madelinetosh Merino Light gave us a huge selection of beautiful colors to choose from. (I recommend taking a look in the projects gallery on ravelry to be inspired by the beautiful variety of colors.)

I would highly recommend this pattern to anyone wanting to make a lace cardigan. The pattern is well written and so beautiful in its simplicity. It is knit all in one piece with seaming under the arms. The lace pattern is very easy to memorize but gives the knitting process enough variety for a longer project. It was so easy to make I am considering putting it on the list to make one for myself in the future.

Knit Progress: Gloves and more Gloves!

The stash-busting and arts festival inventory-creating has begun! I’ve pulled out all of those little balls of leftover yarn and have had the best time creating fun combinations of colors and textures. I can’t seem to stop making variations on striped gloves. Since these projects don’t take much yarn, I’ll be able to make a few more solid color pairs too. I don’t plan to stop for another week or two. We’ll see how many I can do!

Knit Progress: Socks & gloves

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Summer is time for me to start looking forward to end of year presents and our local arts festival. After finishing up my new sock patterns, I decided to make two more pairs of the Twists and Braids socks with some newly acquired Madelinetosh Tosh Sock yarn. I love the vibrancy of the yarns and it was fun to see how the pattern looks in Flashdance versus Antique Lace.

The sock patterns translate nicely into simple fingerless gloves, my most popular item at the Cherokee Heights Arts Festival in November. I have a bunch of stashed yarn, so I’ll be working through some of it to create items for the fall. I enjoy working within the constraints of the yarn colors and textures I have available to create combinations I wouldn’t have paired otherwise. Look for lots of glove updates soon!

Knit Pattern: Twists & Braids Socks

These highly textured socks use slip-stitch cabling to create flat twists and braids that are mirrored on front and back of the sock from the center. When worn the sock stretches to reveal the beautiful detail of the ribs.

Size: Women’s 5-9.

Pattern repeat: 31 sts and 12 rows.

Needles: US 1.5 (2.5 mm) double pointed needles, set of 4.

Gauge: 15 stitches and 22 rows = 2 inches (5 cm) stockinette worked in the round (unblocked).

Yarn: Sock weight yarn. Approximately 296 yards. Sample knit in a fingering 4-ply – 175yds/50g

Instructions include full written directions, charts and unstretched sock measurements.

Available on Etsy for $3.50
Available on Craftsy for $3.50

Knit Pattern: His Simple Socks

This is a simple ribbed sock pattern knit from the top down and is designed to easily keep count of rows without becoming too monotonous. The ribs have a twisted knit stitch in the middle to help define the line of the ribs in the sock.

Size: Men’s Size 8-10.
Pattern repeat is 5 stitches and can be easily adjusted by increasing or decreasing repeats or rows.

Needles: US 1 (2.25 mm) double pointed needles, set of 4.

Gauge: 8 stitches and 11 rows = 1 inch (2.5 cm) stockinette worked in the round (unblocked).

Yarn: Sock weight yarn. Approximately 325 yards. Sample knit in a fine sock weight – 230yds/50g

Pattern includes written instructions, pattern chart and finished measurements.

Available on Etsy for $3.50

Available on Craftsy for $3.50

Knit Progress: Pillows

Good things come in threes! While my knitting has slowed down, I’ve enjoyed creating some simple double knit pillows that have allowed me to explore combining various yarn from my stash. Using the technique I picked up from a frogged project, I decided to use it to knit both sides of a pillow at the same time to avoid trying to line up color blocking or figure out the proper length and maintain clean seams easily. The only trick is to make sure you don’t miss a stitch and accidentally knit the  opposite faces together in the process.

Using multiple strands of yarn at once increases the chance of picking up part of an adjacent stitch, but the color variation is well worth it! Different strands of yarn come to the surface in each stitch, giving the fabric created extra depth and variety.

Here is my simple pattern for the pillows above (makes a cover for a 16˝ pillow):

I used 3 strands of yarn at any given time: worsted or bulky and sock weight.

US 10 circular needle

Long-tail CO 94 st.

P1, sl 1 for each row.
You will be working half of the stitches in each row, creating one side of a double-sided fabric.

Work in purl double knit until square.
BO 2 inches together
BO active stitches on the side, placing the “sl” stitches on a separate needle to create an opening until 2 inches from end.
Work in p1, sl1 to end of row.
BO 2 inches together and then BO remaining sts on second needle for second side.
Sew in invisible zipper to opening.

Enjoy your pillow!

Gifting Knits: Ladies & Literature Book Club edition

In addition to knitting, reading is one of my hobbies. A few years ago I met a great group of local ladies through a Goodreads group called Ladies & Literature. Since then the group has opened up to international members and numbers in the thousands. I am lucky to be one of five moderators for the group. One of my projects is the Annual Top Reader Competition that challenges our book club members to participate in every single “official” book club discussion for the year. That turns out to be 16 book discussions a year, one each month with a quarterly Classic book on top. This year we had 8 ladies complete the challenge. Of those 8, three win the big prize.

One of the prizes I supply is a custom knit piece. This year I worked with two of the winners to make a custom piece just for them based on my patterns. I love it when two hobbies can come together!

In addition to the prizes, one of our moderators is expecting her first baby, which was recently revealed to be a boy. After looking through patterns and inspiration, I decided to create my own version of a hooded blanket with bear ears. I had some Bernat Baby Blanket yarn on hand and was so pleased with how soft and thick a blanket it makes. You can get the notes for the blanket design here.

Happy Knitting and Reading!