Spinning Yarns

My mini electric eel wheel has allowed me to explore spinning up yarns this year. With a variety of fibers, I’ve been able to explore very fine barber pole yarns to chain-plied long run color transitions.

Prints: New. Improved.

kurt_seidle_xed_7Some prints get wrecked in the printing process. It makes sense that hand-printed works are more susceptible to flaws than mechanically printed ones, but knowing that still doesn’t make it any easier to take. Inconsistencies – whether it’s ink flow, a knick in the stencil, a fingerprint or smudge – can ruin a perfectly good print. It happens. It’s just part of the process. I know this, yet I still take the flaws pretty hard.

But I got tired of feeling this way and sought to do something about it. Rather than looking at flaws as a door closing, I decided to look at them as a window opening. By doing so, there’s an opportunity to add new ideas or, in this case, make corrections. I embraced the flaws and just canceled them out. Literally.

My first step was to unearth slightly less-than-perfect prints from the depths of purgatory (i.e. the neither-here-nor-there void of the flat file) and assess the damage. Next up was fixing them. That’s achieved here by masking the flaws with a big, blunt mark. Simple as that. Rather than just erasing the flaws, I chose to acknowledge and celebrate them.

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In some cases, crossing out the mistakes added to the composition. In others, it was just a means to an end. While making perfect compositions was certainly not the goal, there are some beautiful moments to behold.

There’s beauty in everything. Finding it is just a matter of perspective. Clearly my interest in signage, typography, and found objects influenced the direction, but, in retrospect, there are other references that come to mind, like the butterfly joint in a George Nakashima table or even the knots in a piece of plywood.

These days, it’s about accepting what comes your way. Taking each day as it arrives – with all the highs and lows – and making the best of it. That, in a sense, is what the Correction Series is all about.

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Pictured: “Untitled (Correction)” 2020, “Untitled (Correction)” 2020, “Untitled (Correction)” 2020, “Untitled (Correction)” 2020. 

Prints: Strange Days

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On March 29, Kurt printed a variation of an old design that had been sitting dormant and neglected, having never seen the light of day. Until now! It felt like a good way to start off 2020 and a much-needed bright spot during these otherwise unusual days. The edition features a randomized mix of colors in a tight edition of 19. All signed, dated, and numbered.

Pattern: Agnes Mitts

 

It’s that time again – design time. I’ve had fun this year exploring a bunch of different techniques and patterns that have influenced the direction of my own design for this season of fingerless gloves.

I started sketching some patterns with both colorwork and texture in mind and decided to explore both techniques using on design. Hopefully, this will be the first in a small series of patterns on the theme. This first pattern explores stripes and ribs. I love how different the design looks based on technique.

Both patterns are bundled together so you can explore both!

The colorwork version utilizes stranded knitting to create a graphic pattern in stockinette. Please be sure to loosely strand the colors in back to create a flat fabric and avoid bumpy sections between colors.

Colorwork Version
Glove length: 8.5 in (21.6 cm), Flat width: 3 in (7.6 cm) – larger in thumb gusset area.
Yarn: Worsted weight, two colors; MC: 70 yds, CC: 60 yds

The texture version uses knit and purl stitches to create texture, perfect for showing off solid and semi-solid color yarn.

Texture Version
Glove length: 7 in (17.8 cm), Flat width: 3 in (7.6 cm) – larger in thumb gusset area.
Yarn: Worsted weight, 100 yds

Needles: US 6 (4.0 mm) double pointed needles – set of 4 recommended.
These fingerless mitts knit from the bottom cuff up.
They are knit in the round.
Size: Adult

Special skills:
• Knitting in the round
• Increase & Decrease

Buy it on Etsy
Buy it on Craftsy

Prints: Let’s Go!

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The changing* of the seasons has really lightened my mood. Sure, I love summer for the beaches and mountains and pools and ice cream and general carefree fun, but the soul-crushing heat and humidity has finally pushed me to the breaking point. Summer 2018 seemed especially hot and, though I’m not certain we broke any records, it definitely was long.

Now it’s time to get back back out to the workshop and make it happen. And I’m ready. Seriously, that statement can’t be circled, underlined or highlighted enough. My summer days were filled with sketching and color studies in anticipation of that very moment the clock struck Labor Day. Each day arrived filled with ideas and inspiration. Nights were filled with dreams awash in weirdo, day-glo colors.

So humidity, if you hear me, get your act together and move along. My screens are prepped, colors are ready and it’s time to get to work.

*Autumn does not actually begin until September 23rd.

Prints: Untitled, 2018

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Just locked in two colors on this new screenprint for 2018. I’ve been very much looking forward to exploring more hard-edged, geometric abstraction this year and Untitled was an awesome design with which to kickstart the season.

Seriously, is there anything more exciting than designing a multi-color piece and locking in that final color on the print run? It’s like putting in that last piece of a jigsaw puzzle. The thrill never gets old.