Prints: Monoprint #21, 2017

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I love it how things just sometimes come together. Three colors on white.

Prints: Test Dept.

Natural

Up and running slowly but surely this fine 2017 season. I kicked things off, oiled things up and dusted of the cobwebs (from the elbows, that is) with a little test run of an old favorite.

In case you wanted know, here are a few things I learned printing that day:

  1. Printing with art stretched on wooden frames is really frustrating. After washing the ink out of the frame a few times, the wood begins to bow and warp making it quite difficult to get a clean, even pull of the squeegee. And this is a treated frame, too. Maybe it’s just old. Aluminum frames are much better in this regard – and much lighter, too.
  2. Printing with copper (a mixture of gold and red and perhaps something else) thickens and gunks up your screen rather quickly. A bit of humidity certainly doesn’t help the situation. But I was surprised at how quickly said situation deteriorated.

This season is shaping up to be a little more unusual – pleasantly and surprisingly so – than seasons past. I’m rolling with it and I think the body of work will reflect this embrace of the fluidity.

More to come.

 

Prints: Monoprint #17, 2015

kurt_seidle_monoprint_17

We’re gearing up for what looks to be another stellar year for Cherokee Heights Arts Festival this Saturday in Marietta, Georgia. It should be a beautiful day—bright, sunny and cool—perfect for celebrating the creativity that abounds in our neighborhood.

Knits and Prints will have a ton of new work to share, so come out and stop by our booth. With that in mind, here’s a new monoprint fresh from the studio—eight colors on white.

Prints: Intermission

kurt_seidle_process_2015

In the midst of a hectic spring schedule, I’ve been working on a bunch of different editions all at once. Typically I go one at time, but this season I seem to be ping-ponging back and forth between various themes, aesthetics and colorways—all at once. Not sure whether it’s the pace of things, the weather or what, but I’m rolling with it and am anxious to see how things shake out.

In the meantime, here are a few artifacts from the last couple of sessions. They’re just pieces of the process, but still worthy of some attention.

kurt_seidle_colors_2015

Prints: And We’re Off!

kurt_seidle_arrows_in_process

Have I titled a blog post this way before? Seems like I’m always kickstarting the season with some sort of cliched header and for some reason this one seems familiar. Yes? No? Oh well, we’ll just go with it.

I started printing again last week with a simple two color design. Arrows. It’s all about the arrows. Don’t get me started about arrows. Oh really? You haven’t heard? Well then, let me discuss. I’ll keep it brief. Promise.

Arrows are the perfect form. They’re bold, angular, directional, geometric, purposeful, iconic, graphic, dynamic, exclamatory, international and come in all sorts of different shapes and sizes. All that and yet they still manage to say what needs to be said: this/you, here. You can’t get much better than that.


Prints: Untitled (Chevron), 2014

kurt_seidle_chevron_green_gold

I usually don’t revisit artwork once it’s been retired. Last year, though, I was asked to reconsider and take another look at my Chevron print of 2012. While initially reluctant, I said yes (I’m apprehensive about delving too deeply back into the archive for fear of watering down—or extinguishing—that initial spark. I’m also inclined to keep pressing forward and letting the past speak for itself. There are so many ideas and so little time that I’d rather just work on something new). But, alas, I’m getting off-topic. In short, I’m grateful for the extra arm-twisting because it allowed me to see the work with fresh eyes and perhaps bring something new to the table. And lo and behold, inspiration struck.

The latest addition/edition from Fall 2014 was something that popped into my head fully formed: the chevron in green and gold. That was it. No fussing with swatches, no anguished sketching or scrutiny. It had to be be kelly green and metallic gold—right from the get-go. If pressed for some statement on inspiration, I’d say that these colors simply remind me of my hometown. That’s not a statement of longing (nor one of criticism, for that matter), it just is.  It’s an abstraction of things in the air in that place—an apt representation that just feels right.

Prints: Pinwheel Outtake, 2014

kurt_seidle_pinwheel_multi_mono

A botched print turned test print was ultimately layered with six colors and surprised us with the fabulous starburst in the center. Someone remarked that it reminded him of a stained glass window. Sure. Why not? The overprinted colors make it feel even more vibrant and complex. A truly happy accident this one was.